Vain Machine have just dropped their new track Invisible, which releases today with all proceeds going to Project Semicolon.

California is very much the Sunshine State, but like all places, it has a another, less clean cut and pristine side where only the brave and the bold may venture.

Vain Machine (Omar Quiñones on vocals and Anthony Trujillo on synth duties) do just that on new track Invisible, which explores some of the ongoing turmoil caused by living in a culture where the pressure on individuals to be perceived as perfect can come with downsides.

Everything has a price, and the cost of fitting in can be high.

The track sees the band build on their signature sound: references to EBM and Industrial rock are to the fore, which is certain to please the band’s current fans as well as appealing to those who like iconic acts like Nitzer Ebb and Nine Inch Nails.

The lyrics explore the duo’s ongoing interest in what lies beneath the squeaky-clean superficiality of modern society; its reflections on how we use everything from therapy to medication to body modification, as well as other less rewarding coping mechanisms to attempt to fit in will strike a chord with those who view modern culture with caution. The turmoil caused by being marginalised by society, or even our own thoughts, are laid bare in the uncompromising, hard-hitting words.

The subject of the lyrics is something that holds a great deal of personal resonance for Omar: ‘A few years ago when Eat You Alive was written, I was looking at the world and it was losing good people, such as actor Robin Williams, and the pain of a failed mental health system. I took a deep look at how my anxiety and depression could affect those around me. I looked and saw that many around me struggled with the same issues or worse no one knowing they needed help until it was too late. Right now, as we face challenges within our society, in our communities, and around the world; one of the most under-funded areas of public services are for mental health and suicide prevention.’

He goes on the say: ‘This track holds very sentimental value and with it, we wanted to reach out to others and say no one is alone or should ever be afraid to ask for help. The stigma of mental illness is real and something we need to put in the past. There is no shame in getting help when you need it. You should know that you can find the help and support you need and deserve.

In recognition that awareness is urgent, and to keep resources flowing to these vitally needed services. We are announcing that all the proceeds of this track will be donated to Project Semicolon.‘

Project Semicolon is an organisation dedicated to the prevention of suicide. Their work is based on the foundation and belief that suicide is preventable and everyone has a role to play in preventing suicide. Through raising public awareness, educating communities, and equipping every person with the right tools, we know we can save lives.”